For decades, all laptops have come with a TPM.  Now with Microsoft forcing the transition to the next  generation, Linux faces a challenge in that all the previous TPM 1.2 tools don’t work with 2.0.  Having to create new tools for TPM 2.0 also provides the opportunity to integrate the TPM more closely into our current crypto systems and thus give Linux the advantage of TPM resident and therefore secure private keys.  This talks will provide the current state of play in using TPM 2.0 in place of crypto sticks and USB keys for secure key handling; including the algorithm agility of TPM 2.0 which finally provides a support for Elliptic Curve keys which have become the default recently.

This talk will provide an overview of current TSS (Trusted computing group Software Stack) for TPM 2.0 implementation on Linux, including a discussion of the two distinct Intel and IBM stacks with their relative strengths and weaknesses.  We will then move on to integration of the TSS into existing crypto system implementations that allow using TPM resident keys to be used with common tools like openssl, gnutls, gpg, openssh and gnome-keyring.  We will report on the current state of that integration  including demonstrations of how it works and future plans.  The ultimate goal is to enable the seamless use of TPM resident keys in all places where encrypted private keys are currently used, thus increasing greatly the security posture of a standard Linux desktop.

James Bottomley, IBM Research